When Menopause Strikes: Dealing With Hot Flashes

Have you encountered a quick feeling of heat with increased heart rate, skin redness, and sweating? You’re likely entering the menopause phase. Hot flashes, also known as vasomotor symptoms, are a change in body temperature when blood vessels near the surface of the skin expand to cool.

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An article published by BreastCancer.org shows that about 10% to 15% of women suffer from this condition to the point that they need medical attention. It is best to understand what hot flashes are so you know how to deal with them.

How Long Will Hot Flashes Last?

Hot flashes differ per person, but the phase during which a woman has them lasts for about three to five years. According to WebMD.com, some might have this condition for life. There’s no definite time length; however, it gets less severe as time pass. It also becomes worse when the last menstrual period is about to take place.

An ideal way to ease its symptoms is to balance hormones naturally, like applying a natural progesterone cream. Green Gold Nutrition notes that such creams go directly to the bloodstream after the skin absorbs the cream. Its effects may take place after a few minutes or within a few hours.

How Can You Ease the Symptoms of Hot Flashes?

Hot flashes are unavoidable during menopause, but there are ways to reduce their severity. Avoid eating spicy food and drinking alcohol or any beverage with caffeine. Take a cold shower instead of soaking in hot tubs or staying at saunas. During hot days, dress comfortably. Avoid turtlenecks, long-sleeved clothing, or anything made of synthetics and wool.

Make it a habit to stay cool whenever you go outside. Hot weather can significantly change your body temperature. If you don’t want to take medications, changing your lifestyle will do. Eat a low-fat diet, avoid stress, and exercise more.

Hot flashes are part of every woman’s life. The phase is unavoidable, but you can reduce its symptoms so it doesn’t affect your daily activities. Know the triggers of hot flashes, so you can live comfortably even when menopause strikes.